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Twifairy

Painting Stretchy Fabric

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Twifairy   

Question about stretchy fabric

If you paint it, should you stretch it out while doing so?

And if so… How?

 

I'm using Lacquard Lumiere for the paint, and the fabric is very stretchy and thin, sort of feels like a thicker pair of tights... I've confirmed I can iron it and I need to test paint on it, but I highly doubt it won't work.

 

I just need to know if and how I should stretch it while painting

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Rori   

I've only painted on fabric a few times, but I would "stretch" out the garment roughly to the size it would be when worn. You can cut out some cardboard, like from a cereal box or something, and place it inside the stockings, shirt, etc. (Even if you didn't need to stretch it out, putting cardboard inside the garment is a good idea because paint may bleed through to the opposite side!)

 

Fabric paints I've used tend to have more give than a lot of "regular" paints. As always, follow the instructions for the paint product you are using; some recommend ironing after the paint dries to "cure" it, and others make no such recommendation.

 

Also, I'm not sure what garment you are painting, but if you are painting on something store-bought (like a T-shirt or tights), you might want to lightly wash/rinse/dry the item first to get excess starches off before beginning.

 

Good luck!

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Twifairy   

I've only painted on fabric a few times, but I would "stretch" out the garment roughly to the size it would be when worn. You can cut out some cardboard, like from a cereal box or something, and place it inside the stockings, shirt, etc. (Even if you didn't need to stretch it out, putting cardboard inside the garment is a good idea because paint may bleed through to the opposite side!)

 

Fabric paints I've used tend to have more give than a lot of "regular" paints. As always, follow the instructions for the paint product you are using; some recommend ironing after the paint dries to "cure" it, and others make no such recommendation.

 

Also, I'm not sure what garment you are painting, but if you are painting on something store-bought (like a T-shirt or tights), you might want to lightly wash/rinse/dry the item first to get excess starches off before beginning.

 

Good luck!

I know about heat setting and such, and I've tested everything to make sure, but do you know if washing is extremely important? It's a dress and it's already kind of weighed down at strange places, and there's some ribbon on it

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Rori   

If its an item that cannot be easily laundered, I wouldn't worry about it. The risk of damage from laundering may be a worse outcome then not washing starch off. Washing and drying the item would ideally just get excess starch off to give the paint better adhesion.

 

The last item I painted was a few years ago was a variety of taffeta, which absolutely cannot get wet. I didn't wash it and it turned out fine.

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Tokoz   

Whatever you decide to use, make sure you do the thinnest coating possible to get the opacity you need. Thicker applications are more likely to crack and flake when the fabric flexes. You also need to make sure you don't water the paint down too much, as that will also interfere with adhesion. :/

 

Most paints only recommend a 20% to 30% mix with water, but check the label to make sure. You might want to see if there are any flow increasing/clear mixing mediums for use with your brand of paints, as sometimes these can help if the paint needs to be thinned beyond what's recommended with water alone. Sometimes you can find other paints or stand-alone mixing mediums labeled as "stretchy" or for use with stretchy fabrics; they can help, but they can also thicken your paint so be careful.

 

Painting on stretchy fabric also shouldn't be thought of as "permanent," either. Even with the best precautions, the paint will eventually flake off and need touchups -- if you decide to use additives, keep track of how much/which kinds you use for later!

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